Via Francigena

Banca Generali Private for the EAVF: an interview with Alessandro Mauri

Myra Stals
Myra Stals
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Banca Generali Private works with the EAVF to promote awareness about the environment and territorial development, through slow and sustainable tourism. Together we organise events and hikes in the ‘Mauri Area’ of Banca Generali Private: Southern Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany. Dr. Alessandro Mauri, Area Manager in these territories, which are also interested by the Via Francigena, told us all about it in this interview.  

When, but above all why was the cooperation between Banca Generali Private and the EAVF established?

A.M.: The cooperation between my managing area of Banca Generali Private (Southern Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany) and the EAVF was established in 2017 because it is important to us to walk alongside the many pilgrims of the Via Francigena, a cultural route that allows you to discover little known areas of our wonderful country and to promote awareness-raising actions on environmental sustainability, a theme which is very dear to our bank. Banca Generali also offers a set of investments that are consistent with the sustainable development goals of the UN Agenda 2030, which allows customers to build their portfolio by prioritizing some of the seventeen sustainable development goals.

What are the initiatives planned for 2022 to support the Via?

A.M: In 2022 we are going to support the Via Francigena through a series of initiatives organized by the EAVF. Concretely, we are going to support the walks of the “I Love Francigena” events, which was very successful in the past editions. These free walk events bring together tourists, pilgrims, enthusiasts, local associations and operators in order to jointly promote the areas crossed by the event.

What are the long-term goals of this cooperation?

A.M: We believe it is essential to raise people’s awareness of the environment and of the territory, which is something that the Via Francigena has been doing for ages. Our bank can provide economic and cultural support, helping to develop greater attention to these themes as heritage for future generations. I too have two children and I do hope I can do something concrete to leave them a better world.

What are the challenges of slow tourism and how do they intertwine with economy?

A.M: The real challenge is to convince people to practice tourism in a more sustainable and conscious way, for example by walking or cycling along the Via Francigena. This will help local communities to have immediate benefits – including economic ones – since not only tourists contribute to local economy but also, they produce an induced effect because pilgrims can – once they have ended their journey – come back again to those places as tourists.